paleontology
Fossil elephant tooth

A huge tooth like this one discovered in Serbia is an exciting find.

Serbian fossil Elephant tooth.

Mammoth or Mastodon?

Location: Svetozar Miletic, Serbia

Fossil Collector: Ivan K.

[Editor's note: A wonderful fossil find! This huge tooth is almost certainly that of an ancient elephant. Do any of our collectors know which species it is? Please leave a comment.]

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7 Responses to “Serbian Fossil Tooth”

  1. cbk says:

    I am certain it is one of the mammoths, rather than mastodon or gomphethere. Can’t help much past that.

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  2. traxanas says:

    It is either a mammoth or an elephant. Mastodons have nipple-like tooth as their name suggests (mastos= tit in greek). It could be an ancestral mammoth, more likely. If you mesured the average enamel thickness on the occlusal area and the height of the bigest plate from the side maybe we could tell more.

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  3. [...] Ejemplo de molar fósil de proboscídeo. Crédito: My Fossil Find [...]

  4. marti says:

    it’s definately a mammoth tooth, 10,000 to 1.2 million years old.

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  5. [...] Los dientes son huesos especialmente constituidos para soportar condiciones muy duras: la sempiterma exposición al mundo exterior, la inacabable acción bacteriana y el continuo roer y mascar materiales duros y abrasivos. Esta preparación otorga al diente una mayor resistencia que le permite sobrevivir mejor que los demás huesos al proceso de fosilización. Ejemplo de molar fósil de proboscídeo. Crédito: My Fossil Find [...]

  6. Hans van Essen says:

    This is the hindmost / 6th / last molar (M3) from the right lower jaw of a woolly mammoth (Mammuthus primigenius), presumably from the last Glacial. The specimen had already lost about seven lamellae through wear when this individual died at a well advanced age. The deep furrow through the occlusal surface indicates a slightly anomalous build of the lamellae it divides into two unequal parts: these are each separated by an extra deep and wide cleft. Normally the top of each lamella is divided into three parts by two of such clefts, which in M3s of the woolly mammoth are on average ca. 25 mm deep and just a few mm wide (see the hindmost lamellae in the occlusal surface, which remain unfused). In this specimen the normal tripartite division is also still visible in the anterior lamellae because these show constrictions to the left and right of the midline, along which line the lamellae are thickest.
    The specimen apparently lost much of its roots, which at this wear stage usually have already fused to form a single, keel-shaped structure. Although this molar does not belong to the southern mammoth (M. meridionalis), nor to the steppe mammoth (M. trogontherii), it is still a very nice find.

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  7. Riley says:

    I believe it is from a steppe mammoth based on the enamel patterns, I have a few from this species, much rarer than a tooth from a woolly mammoth molar and in great shape

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