paleontology
Kentucky fossil worm burrows?

Fossil tree roots or worm burrows? I found this fossil when we were doing some dozer and excavator work, and found it very unusual. We found several large pieces, some of the rocks/fossils were 18 inches wide and about 18 inches long, it appears to be possibly tree roots or something, am completely stumped and wanted to see if anyone else could identify. I've researched it a little more and I think it seems to be a trace fossil burrow similar to Thalassinoides.

Does anyone recognize this? Please leave a response.

Fossil Collector: JessicaW

Location: Eastern Kentucky

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9 Responses to “Fossil Worm Burrows?”

  1. Ray says:

    I have no idea but I have a similar find; also Eastern Kentucky.

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  2. mike says:

    What I believe you have is fossilized algae mat that trapped sand in a shallow shoreline, that was hit by storm waves and rolled up. I have seen these structures before, even a photo of a dinosaur footprint with these structures around it.

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  3. linda says:

    Algae or worm borrows-need to know specific location of your find.

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  4. Yolanda says:

    I own a rock exactly like that, but of a different composition. Unfortunately I seem unable to upload a photo. My piece comes from the Karoo Basin, South Africa, between Beaufort West and Graaff Reinet. Through a friend at my local museum complex, mine was identified by WITS University as a pre-historic prawn ancestor, taken by surprise in their nest 236 million years ago during volcanic activity.

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  5. Brian says:

    I saw a similar fossil on a WV fossil site. It was listed as a trilobite feeding site.

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  6. abyssunder says:

    Thalassinoides trace fossils for sure.

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  7. Creb Cavebear says:

    This resembles the fossil that was recently stolen from my home, not to implicate you in any way. My fossil which I was very fond of was discovered by my son and me. We found it in a creek in eastern Kentucky. I suppose I showed it to the wrong relative who probably thought it was cool and just a rock after all. Anyway I thought I would share my brother’s take on the object. He is a coal miner and he believed the fossil is the remains of a snake den with entertwined serpents. In the mountains we know different species of snakes hybernate and den together. He thought that some time in history a dead man’s rock fell on the den and there it remained for millions of years…..until one day, a woman and her autistic son found the rock. It is sad that our rock was stolen. Where in eastern Kentucky did you find this rock if you don’t mind my asking?

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  8. Creb Cavebear says:

    Awaiting an answer to fossil question.

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  9. Dick says:

    I also have some of these rocks which came from eastern Ky. I am very interested in any rock history anyone might know about them, they are plentiful in certain areas. why? Are they a market for these? Please reply if anyone has any ideas. thank you

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