Fossil horse teeth of South Florida

Native Americans called the Peace River "Talakchopcohatchee," which means "River of Peas." Somewhere along the way, white settlers changed it to Peace River. Today the Peace River is eagerly explored for fossil remains like these fossil horse teeth.

Photo: Courtesy Mark Rentz
Location: Peace River, Florida
Fossil Expeditions

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Pleistocene shark teeth from the Caloosahatchee Formation

In some places along the Caloosahatchee River, the banks are made up of river bottom deposited by the U.S. Army Corps. of Engineers' dredges. Shark teeth are the most common finds in a region is known as the Caloosahatchee Formation. The material is from the Pleistocene Epoch, which spans 10,000 to 1.8 million years.

Photo: Courtesy Mark Rentz
Location: Caloosahatchee River, Florida
Fossil Expeditions

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Stingray dental pavements are common vertebrate fossil finds.

Stingray dental pavements are common vertebrate fossil finds. These fascinating bits of stingray have long been a favorite and were some of the first vertebrate fossils I ever found.

Location: South Florida

Collector: Scott Stepanski

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Fossil bone found on the beach at Venice, Florida

I found this mystery bone washed up on the shore of the beach in Venice, FL around 1997. I've tried a few times to have it identified but to no avail. I'm hoping someone here can identify it.

Location: Venice, Florida

Fossil Collector:  AlexaGreen

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Peace River Florida petrified wood fossils.

A screen load of petrified wood collected on a Peace River, Florida Fossil Expedition.

Photo: Courtesy Mark Rentz
Location: Peace River, Florida
Fossil Expeditions

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