Fossil dolphin teeth are less than one inch long

Fossil porpoise teeth are tiny and often overlooked by collectors searching for the "Big One," but there are well deserving of some attention. Each of these teeth is less than an inch long, but still sharply pointed for catching and holding fish just like their modern relatives today.

Location: Lee Creek Mine, Aurora, North Carolina

Collector: Scott Stepanski

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Rating: +5 (from 5 votes)
North Carolina dolphin flipper fossil

This delicate bone is scarely 3/4 of an inch long and is from the flipper of a small whale or dolphin. These bones are the phalanges or "finger bones inside the pectoral fins (flippers). The Pungo and Yorktown Formations are rich in these bones when uncovered at the phosphate mine near Aurora.

Location: Lee Creek Mine, North Carolina

Collector: Scott Stepanski

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Rating: +2 (from 2 votes)
Fossil cow shark teeth from the Lee Creek phosphate mine in Aurora, NC

Some of our favorite fossils: Cow Shark teeth. These are from the always productive Lee Creek phosphate mine near Aurora, North Carolina. The fossils are each about 1.5 inches long.

Collector: Scott S.

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Rating: +4 (from 4 votes)
Fossil fish jaws from Aurora, NC.

Fish bones abound in phosphate mines like these from Aurora, NC. These are the powerful jaws of porcupine fish and a few other others.

Collector: Scott S

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Rating: +4 (from 4 votes)
fossil whale tooth from North Carolina

Collecting at Aurora, North Carolina's Lee Creek Mine is always a treat. This little whale tooth is just over an inch long and nicely shaped. It was not the largest find of the day, but a memorable one.

Collector: Scott S.

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Rating: +3 (from 3 votes)