Fossil dolphin teeth are less than one inch long

Fossil porpoise teeth are tiny and often overlooked by collectors searching for the "Big One," but there are well deserving of some attention. Each of these teeth is less than an inch long, but still sharply pointed for catching and holding fish just like their modern relatives today.

Location: Lee Creek Mine, Aurora, North Carolina

Collector: Scott Stepanski

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fossil elephant teeth from the Peace River of Florida.

Try picking one of these out of your fossil screen. These fossil elephant teeth were discovered in the Peace River of Florida.

Photo: Courtesy Mark Rentz
Location: Peace River, Florida
Fossil Expeditions

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North Carolina dolphin flipper fossil

This delicate bone is scarely 3/4 of an inch long and is from the flipper of a small whale or dolphin. These bones are the phalanges or "finger bones inside the pectoral fins (flippers). The Pungo and Yorktown Formations are rich in these bones when uncovered at the phosphate mine near Aurora.

Location: Lee Creek Mine, North Carolina

Collector: Scott Stepanski

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Rating: +2 (from 2 votes)