Pleistocene deer teeth are an accidental find at Big Brook.

Although Big Brook is primarily known for it's Cretaceous fossils, other tidbits occasionally fall into the collector's screen. These deer teeth weathered out of a much more recent deposit from the stream banks. It is possible to find nearly anything when you are stream collecting. If anyone has a better ID on the teeth please post a response.Each is about one inch long.

Location: Big Brook, NJ

Collector: Scott S.

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fossil tooth from Big Brook, New Jersey

Maybe some of you Big Brook collectors can help with this one? The piece is about one inch wide and .75 inch tall. Although it certainly resembles a tooth, I am not 100% convinced about it. It is set very tightly into a piece of bone and does not look quite like other teeth I have found there. The tip is broken so it would have been a bit pointier at one time. Any ideas out there?

Location: Monmouth County, NJ

Cretaceous: Mt. Laurel Formation (?)

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Cape May Point, NJ Shark Teeth

These tiny teeth are more interesting for their location than their diminutive 1/4 inch size. I found them by carefully picking through the gravel at Cape May, NJ. Most people who travel to Cape May Point and notice the beach gravel at Sunset Beach are in search of the clear quartz pebbles called “Cape May Diamonds.” If you want to find shark teeth, however, you will need to get face down in the gravel and literally flick through it with your finger grain by grain. Screening is useless because of all the gravel. The teeth are tiny and few and far between, but if you persevere, you will find them. The fossil age and formation is left to the imagination although they look Miocene. These teeth could have traveled down the length of the Delaware River into Delaware Bay from just about any tributary or perhaps even down the coast. While looking for the teeth you may find other interesting tidbits including horn corals from upriver and even bits of surf polished amethyst.

Location: Cape May Point, NJ

Photo: Scott S

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fossil footprint new jersey

This little reptile footprint is from an abandoned shale quarry in Norhtern New Jersey. I collected it a long time ago so the place it probably a housing development by now. Pity. I wish I drove around there more often to keep track of fresh building sites. Sometimes fossils are exposed for only short while. The track is just over one inch long. I would love to hear if anyone is still finding tracks in New Jersey.

Photo: Scott S.

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My first fossils

There is a reason these common fossils are the first photo posted on this blog. These crinoid, coral and horn coral fossil are the first fossils I collected many years ago near my home in New Jersey. Coral fossils are abundant in the yellow stones of the Kirkwood Formation. They whet my appetite for fossils throughout my life. 

Photo: Scott S

Coral Fossils: Kirkwood Formation, NJ

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